Who pays for the political advertising of the major parties before elections?

Posted on May 31st, 2011 by admin1 in political advertising


Not sure if you’re talking about Australian elections but, if so, here’s a reply I just posted about a similar question. "Hang on everyone. Let’s differentiate between government advertising and party political advertising. If the government ( Federal or State) says " this government is doing this" it’s government advertising which has always been accepted. If it says " The Liberal Party " or " The Labor Party" ( state level for example), that’s party political advertising and can’t be funded by taxpayers’ money. Why do you think parties are always doing fundraising? Hope this clears it up. Also, remember that if the government advertises vacancies, that’s also included in the advertising budget total.P.S. If the government ( at any level) didn’t say that it had accomplished things, people would say " what has the government done?’. Remember too, a road works initiative sign eliminating an accident blackspot is part of the advertising budget."

8 Comments on “Who pays for the political advertising of the major parties before elections?”

  1. Sarangapani S

    Big busunessmenReferences :

  2. FRAGINAL-NOYPI

    Party supporters give the financial aid for the advertisements of the party before the election but the accounting is usually not made public.References :

  3. the.texican

    Its always the taxpayers of courseReferences :

  4. dluv1126

    Campaign contributors and their respective party affiliations. The DNC chooses to allot a certain amount to each candidate as does the RNC. Then each candidate also uses their funds that they raise individually. That is why it is so important to raise campaign funds so far in advance of declaring for the election.References :

  5. ogr8bearded1

    Well, the candidates usually pay for one for them out of funds that have been donated to their campaign. Also the Democrap and Republican parties have funds to promote various people or their platforms. Then of course you have the ‘special interest’ groups that usually do negative ads, usually with the secret approval of the candidate or party without bringing a backlash on the candidate or party since they can deny having any connection with the group that made it.References :

  6. sea link2

    YOUReferences :

  7. ADS

    BusinessmenReferences :

  8. ezc692

    Not sure if you’re talking about Australian elections but, if so, here’s a reply I just posted about a similar question. "Hang on everyone. Let’s differentiate between government advertising and party political advertising. If the government ( Federal or State) says " this government is doing this" it’s government advertising which has always been accepted. If it says " The Liberal Party " or " The Labor Party" ( state level for example), that’s party political advertising and can’t be funded by taxpayers’ money. Why do you think parties are always doing fundraising? Hope this clears it up. Also, remember that if the government advertises vacancies, that’s also included in the advertising budget total.P.S. If the government ( at any level) didn’t say that it had accomplished things, people would say " what has the government done?’. Remember too, a road works initiative sign eliminating an accident blackspot is part of the advertising budget."References :

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